The Personal Side of “Downsized”

Not to sound pessimistic, but sooner or later, almost everyone has to deal with the implications of being downsized. How people deal with it is as different as night and day. I’ve seen a wide and varied range of emotions and responses from those who experience job loss. How you deal with it can determine how quickly you turn-around and your ability to capture opportunities in front of you.

Leadership in Academia: What is Leadership?

Universities as organizations have always been more complicated than their private or public sector peers. Bi-cameral governance, the impact of academic freedom on the nature of the faculty’s relationship with the institution and the reliance on government funding with all the strings that are attached make for a challenging environment. And as Dr. Ross Paul points out in Leadership Under Fire. The Challenging Role of the Canadian University President, the university has become an even more complex institution to lead from within.

So you didn’t get the job: Three important tips to improve your chances on the next one.

Finding out you didn’t get the job when you had every qualification listed on the job description and you thought you aced the interview can be baffling and incredibly frustrating. No matter how strongly you feel, the way you react could make or break your chances of getting the offer in the future. Here are three things to keep in mind after getting that call:

Don’t take it personally

Leader's Insight: Robert MacLeod, CEO, Invest New Brunswick

At age 26, Robert MacLeod changed jobs, packed up his belongings and said good-bye to his life in New Brunswick. His mission: criss-cross Canada as leader in sales for McCain Foods. For a small-town boy with powerful family connections to New Brunswick, the experience was challenging but deeply formative — his first entry point into the rich, multi-cultural world of global business.

Calling All Leaders

Viewpoint by Mark Surrette, President, Knightsbridge Robertson Surrette

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At a time when accessing global markets is so crucial to the competitiveness of Atlantic Canadian businesses, the world’s most advanced economies are experiencing a level of social and economic instability unprecedented in recent years. And the ripple effect of these unstable times – on consumer confidence, investors, trading partners and customers, touches all of us, both directly and indirectly.

Leader's Insight: Don Clow, CEO, Crombie REIT

From the outset, P.E.I. native Don Clow has been what’s known in athletic circles as “coachable.” Which is perhaps why the 49-year-old chartered accountant and CEO of Crombie REIT — Atlantic Canada’s largest property owner — has been mentored by, and worked side-by-side with, some of the region’s business and athletic luminaries, including legendary football coach John Huard, property developers Simon and Jim Spatz and the Sobey family.

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